DEADLINE EXTENDED: SUBMIT YOUR MSO BENCHMARKING SURVEYS BY JUNE 30TH, 2024. LEARN MORE

The ENT Market Playbook – A Guide to the Nuances of the ENT Market from a Leading ENT MSO V2

Home The ENT Market Playbook – A Guide to the Nuances of the ENT Market from a Leading ENT MSO V2
Drew Franklin, MBA, FACMPE

Drew Franklin, MBA, FACMPE

Medical Practice Executive, ENT Administrator at ENT Specialty Partners

I’m a strategic advisor for Albany ENT and Allergy Services. I’ve been with the practice for four years. I’ve been in ENT for 18 years, having previously worked with ENT and Allergy Associates, which is the largest Ear, Nose and Throat practice in the country. I have my MBA from NYU Stern. I’m a fellow of the American College of Medical Practice Executives, and I’m very happy to be here.

Gavin Setzen

CEO & President at Albany ENT & Allergy Services

My journey’s a little circuitous to Albany, having grown up in South Africa. I went to medical school in South Africa, did a short stint at a family practice, 60 miles north of North Dakota, waiting for my green card. I completed a partial general surgery residency in New York City. Before coming up to Albany, I completed my ENT Head and Neck surgery residency here and loved the Adirondacks, the upstate New York area. I had a great opportunity to take over the practice of a solo practitioner and have lived in upstate New York since that time. We developed a great platform in comprehensive otolaryngology here, growing the practice to now our 10th physician and onboarding our 20th physician assistant. We have a very diverse, broadbased, comprehensive type of practice and we can certainly talk more about the offerings and ancillaries and other care services that we provide. It’s been a very rewarding, important journey, and we’re glad to be providing care to upstate New York and contiguous communities in southern Vermont, Western Massachusetts, and the like.

  • Half adults and half kids
  • Lends itself well to ancillaries
  • Allergy
  • Audiology and hearing aids
  • Hearing and balance testing and therapies
  • Immunotherapy
  • Speech and swallowing
  • CT imaging
  • ASC
  • Clinical research

Background

Drew Franklin, MBA, FACMPE

Drew Franklin, MBA, FACMPE

Medical Practice Executive, ENT Administrator at ENT Specialty Partners

I’m a strategic advisor for Albany ENT and Allergy Services. I’ve been with the practice for four years. I’ve been in ENT for 18 years, having previously worked with ENT and Allergy Associates, which is the largest Ear, Nose and Throat practice in the country. I have my MBA from NYU Stern. I’m a fellow of the American College of Medical Practice Executives, and I’m very happy to be here.

Gavin Setzen

CEO & President at Albany ENT & Allergy Services

My journey’s a little circuitous to Albany, having grown up in South Africa. I went to medical school in South Africa, did a short stint at a family practice, 60 miles north of North Dakota, waiting for my green card. I completed a partial general surgery residency in New York City. Before coming up to Albany, I completed my ENT Head and Neck surgery residency here and loved the Adirondacks, the upstate New York area. I had a great opportunity to take over the practice of a solo practitioner and have lived in upstate New York since that time. We developed a great platform in comprehensive otolaryngology here, growing the practice to now our 10th physician and onboarding our 20th physician assistant. We have a very diverse, broadbased, comprehensive type of practice and we can certainly talk more about the offerings and ancillaries and other care services that we provide. It’s been a very rewarding, important journey, and we’re glad to be providing care to upstate New York and contiguous communities in southern Vermont, Western Massachusetts, and the like.

Interview

Gavin, you are a past president of the National Academy of ENT, and you continue to be a leader in many ENT and allergy-related nonprofit institutions regionally,
nationally, and locally. How does your wide portfolio of leadership positions influence Albany ENT on a practical
day-to-day basis? Do those two things bridge well, or do you view them as totally separate?

My involvement in clinical medicine has always been the passion that has driven me in the field. I’ve always found the integration and balance brought perspective on healthcare otolaryngology and head and neck surgery as well. I am very much influenced by my counterbalancing love of organized medicine and healthcare leadership. And I think the two have made me a better clinician, better surgeon, and better healthcare leader. I was a past president of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, a 14,000-physician body. I’ve been involved at the local level in both academic and private practice endeavors and various national and state and other organizations, including outside of direct ENT involvement as president of the intersocietal accreditation commission for CT imaging, for example. We helped bring CT imaging and standards to the ENT community quite some time ago. It helps inform my ability to provide better care and understand the environment including healthcare policy, the challenges in healthcare, the opportunities as it relates to research, the provision of cutting-edge drug and device development, and just a better general perspective on what the overall landscape looks like in both future care delivery options and adhering to best practices, clinical guidelines and so on.  Those are all helpful, useful perspectives that I think enable me to provide better care and better leadership in the field and in our practice and region in general.

The portion of the pie chart that is business related, that benefits from those memberships, what would you put in that category? Is it easier recruiting, brand development and exposure? Is it research on new revenue streams that are developing across the industry? What are the categories that you think have really been augmented by those volunteer leadership positions?

I think it’s a little bit of each of those. What has been important to me in the field is specialty unity at a time when everybody’s competing for patients and the healthcare dollar. We’ve been able to bring together subspecialty groups within the practice. We’ve been able to enhance our national and international profile. So, to your point, from a recruiting perspective, that’s been extraordinarily helpful. It helps me stay abreast of coding policy, healthcare policy, and regulatory change in the entire environment so that I’m able to plan ahead, see ahead, and know what’s coming in our field and at the national level to be able to adapt. As a result, we’ve modified how we do things and what our verticals look like in terms of ancillaries to better prepare for impending changes. And all of those components have helped us better fortify the practice for change ahead. In so doing, we strengthen our ability to improve care delivery, patient outcomes, and the patient journey, lower the cost of care, and improve revenue at the same time. So, I think it’s a very broadbased approach that has allowed us to increase the value of the practice and, in so doing, improve the patient experience and the quality of the care that we deliver.

Key Takeaways

What makes the ENT market opportunity special?

14,000 providers in the United States. Otolaryngology head and neck surgery being a small specialty only accounts for 1.4% of the healthcare spend, and yet there is considerable diversity and opportunity within the field given the range of service offerings
included in comprehensive ENT care.

  • Half adults and half kids
  • Lends itself well to ancillaries
  • Allergy
  • Audiology and hearing aids
  • Hearing and balance testing and therapies
  • Immunotherapy
  • Speech and swallowing
  • CT imaging
  • ASC
  • Clinical research

Background

Drew Franklin, MBA, FACMPE

Drew Franklin, MBA, FACMPE

Medical Practice Executive, ENT Administrator at ENT Specialty Partners

I’m a strategic advisor for Albany ENT and Allergy Services. I’ve been with the practice for four years. I’ve been in ENT for 18 years, having previously worked with ENT and Allergy Associates, which is the largest Ear, Nose and Throat practice in the country. I have my MBA from NYU Stern. I’m a fellow of the American College of Medical Practice Executives, and I’m very happy to be here.

Gavin Setzen

CEO & President at Albany ENT & Allergy Services

My journey’s a little circuitous to Albany, having grown up in South Africa. I went to medical school in South Africa, did a short stint at a family practice, 60 miles north of North Dakota, waiting for my green card. I completed a partial general surgery residency in New York City. Before coming up to Albany, I completed my ENT Head and Neck surgery residency here and loved the Adirondacks, the upstate New York area. I had a great opportunity to take over the practice of a solo practitioner and have lived in upstate New York since that time. We developed a great platform in comprehensive otolaryngology here, growing the practice to now our 10th physician and onboarding our 20th physician assistant. We have a very diverse, broadbased, comprehensive type of practice and we can certainly talk more about the offerings and ancillaries and other care services that we provide. It’s been a very rewarding, important journey, and we’re glad to be providing care to upstate New York and contiguous communities in southern Vermont, Western Massachusetts, and the like.

Interview

Gavin, you are a past president of the National Academy of ENT, and you continue to be a leader in many ENT and allergy-related nonprofit institutions regionally,
nationally, and locally. How does your wide portfolio of leadership positions influence Albany ENT on a practical
day-to-day basis? Do those two things bridge well, or do you view them as totally separate?

My involvement in clinical medicine has always been the passion that has driven me in the field. I’ve always found the integration and balance brought perspective on healthcare otolaryngology and head and neck surgery as well. I am very much influenced by my counterbalancing love of organized medicine and healthcare leadership. And I think the two have made me a better clinician, better surgeon, and better healthcare leader. I was a past president of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, a 14,000-physician body. I’ve been involved at the local level in both academic and private practice endeavors and various national and state and other organizations, including outside of direct ENT involvement as president of the intersocietal accreditation commission for CT imaging, for example. We helped bring CT imaging and standards to the ENT community quite some time ago. It helps inform my ability to provide better care and understand the environment including healthcare policy, the challenges in healthcare, the opportunities as it relates to research, the provision of cutting-edge drug and device development, and just a better general perspective on what the overall landscape looks like in both future care delivery options and adhering to best practices, clinical guidelines and so on.  Those are all helpful, useful perspectives that I think enable me to provide better care and better leadership in the field and in our practice and region in general.

The portion of the pie chart that is business related, that benefits from those memberships, what would you put in that category? Is it easier recruiting, brand development and exposure? Is it research on new revenue streams that are developing across the industry? What are the categories that you think have really been augmented by those volunteer leadership positions?

I think it’s a little bit of each of those. What has been important to me in the field is specialty unity at a time when everybody’s competing for patients and the healthcare dollar. We’ve been able to bring together subspecialty groups within the practice. We’ve been able to enhance our national and international profile. So, to your point, from a recruiting perspective, that’s been extraordinarily helpful. It helps me stay abreast of coding policy, healthcare policy, and regulatory change in the entire environment so that I’m able to plan ahead, see ahead, and know what’s coming in our field and at the national level to be able to adapt. As a result, we’ve modified how we do things and what our verticals look like in terms of ancillaries to better prepare for impending changes. And all of those components have helped us better fortify the practice for change ahead. In so doing, we strengthen our ability to improve care delivery, patient outcomes, and the patient journey, lower the cost of care, and improve revenue at the same time. So, I think it’s a very broadbased approach that has allowed us to increase the value of the practice and, in so doing, improve the patient experience and the quality of the care that we deliver.

Login SCALE Community

Or

Join SCALE Community

We are excited for you to share in the benefits of SCALE community’s healthcare focus materials. If you are not currently a member sign up now to get unlimited access to all our materials.